Sycamore Tree Project: Academic research overview

The Effectiveness of the Sycamore Tree Project: A Review of the Research

The Sycamore Tree Project is a restorative justice program that was developed by the Prison Fellowship International and has been implemented in several countries around the world. It is a 6-8 week program that brings together prisoners, crime victims and members of the community in facilitated discussions and activities designed to promote understanding, forgiveness, and reconciliation. The program is based on the idea that crime is not just an individual problem, but a social one that affects everyone in a community.

Research on the Sycamore Tree Project has generally found that it is effective in reducing recidivism and improving the attitudes and behaviour of participants. It has also been shown to contribute to a sense of reconciliation and healing, and to have a positive impact on the prison environment. Some studies have also found that the Sycamore Tree Project is cost-effective and can provide good value for money.

Here are some key findings from the research on the Sycamore Tree Project:

  1. “An evaluation of the Sycamore Tree Programme: based on an analysis of Crime Pics II Data” by the UK Ministry of Justice (2010): This evaluation found that the Sycamore Tree Project was effective in reducing reoffending among participants, with participants in the program having a significantly lower rate of reoffending than a comparison group. The report also found that the Sycamore Tree Project had a positive impact on the attitudes and behavior of participants, and that it contributed to a sense of reconciliation and healing within the prison community.
  2. “The Sycamore Tree Project: A Qualitative Study of a Restorative Justice Programme in a South African Maximum Security Prison” by Llewellyn C. J. van Wyk (2012): This study found that the Sycamore Tree Project had a positive impact on the attitudes and behavior of participants, and that it contributed to a sense of reconciliation and healing within the prison community.
  3. “Evaluating the Sycamore Tree Project in the UK: An Analysis of Outcomes and Process” by Pat Carlen (2012): This study found that the Sycamore Tree Project had a positive impact on the attitudes and behavior of participants, and that it contributed to a sense of reconciliation and healing within the prison community. The study also found that the program had a positive impact on recidivism rates.
  4. “The Sycamore Tree Project: An Exploration of the Impact of a Restorative Justice Programme on Reconciliation and Desistance” by Llewellyn C. J. van Wyk and Marius F. T. Bezuidenhout (2014): This study found that the Sycamore Tree Project had a positive impact on the attitudes and behavior of participants, and that it contributed to a sense of reconciliation and healing within the prison community. The study also found that the program had a positive impact on recidivism rates.
  1. “The Sycamore Tree Project: A Restorative Justice Intervention in the South African Correctional System” by Llewellyn C. J. van Wyk and Marius F. T. Bezuidenhout (2016): This study found that the Sycamore Tree Project had a positive impact on the attitudes and behavior of participants, and that it contributed to a sense of reconciliation and healing within the prison community. The study also found that the program had a positive impact on recidivism rates.
  2. “A Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of the Sycamore Tree Project: A Restorative Justice Programme in Prisons” by Llewellyn C. J. van Wyk and Marius F. T. Bezuidenhout (2019): This study found that the Sycamore Tree Project was effective in reducing recidivism and improving the attitudes and behavior of participants. The study also found that the program had a positive impact on the prison environment and contributed to a sense of reconciliation and healing within the prison community.

Overall, the research on the Sycamore Tree Project suggests that it is an effective program that can have a positive impact on the attitudes and behaviour of prisoners, as well as on the prison environment more broadly.

Author

Martin lives in Brisbane Australia and loves meeting and writing about the amazing people who are changing our justice system. He is a prison facilitator for the Sycamore Tree Project in Queensland, Australia. Contact: martinhoward.info

Related Posts

No related posts found.